Turkey, One of The Most Homophobic Countries Against LGBT

Association to combat child abuse and neglect: Everyone has the right to live their life the way they want.

The Association to Combat Child Abuse and Neglect, which confirmed that the march of honor was valued differently by different social classes, conducted a study to see LGBTIs from their own eyes. Turkey is currently there, but the Ottoman Empire is one of the countries with majority intolerance to the last four fathers, Sultan Abdulmecid of LGBT. For the first time in more than 150 years, the association reminds that homosexuality is a crime of being away: “We ask you because I wanted everyone’s life. He called to say at least one person in his area he has the right to live that everyone has the right to love what he wants. ”

Pointing to a family who consulted a psychologist working at the Psychological Support Coordination Center, the club asked that the “homosexual behavior” of their 15-year-old son be treated as the main reason for conducting this study. When it was said that this is not a disease and therefore it is not possible to treat it, the mother said: “If your son says cancer, he can accept it. But it is not possible to accept what he says. Let’s go to another specialist. ” and the family separated.

The research work prepared by the association includes numerous articles, international research work and expert opinions as follows:

“We wanted to go abroad first. In the decision of the governor of the State of California,” studies on the treatment of homosexuals are prohibited because they have no scientific and medical basis. “Homosexuals are all murdered 24 hours a day in Brazil, where there is the greatest participation in the March of Honor in the world, while the rainbow-colored flags of religious terrorist organizations are hanging in front of a police station in the United Kingdom to represent solidarity with Iraq, Syria, Libya One of the questions asked to measure tolerance for homosexuality in an international survey conducted by the Netherlands was “No.” 85% of the answers in our country were “No.” Other than that “No” reasons, although “Yes” is the main common characteristic of those who say that an LGBT has been granted, that they speak or have worked together, according to this study, Turkey is one of the most intolerant countries in the world against LGBT.

“Abdulmecid had banished homosexuality from the crime”
Some of the countries in the same category as our country; Zimbabwe, Ghana, Morocco, Rwanda, Iraq, South Korea. Homosexuality is a crime in almost all of these countries. Abdulmecid, the father of the last four sultans in our country, had banished homosexuality from the crime more than 150 years ago.

According to the International Association of Lesbians and Gays, the number of LGBTI people worldwide is just under 3,000 million. “Gays are inferior to pigs and dogs,” he said. “We love the Creator for the Creator,” said Zimbabwe. Should the geography in which Yunus Emre grew up fall into the same category? Should the geography in which Mevlana Celalettin Rumi grows grow together with the Middle East countries where they marry using violence to correct homosexuals, where lesbians are raped, and the police and militia who take up their duties, not as Crimes apply? Law?

AYM: “Deviant” is hate speech, it is a crime
Given that the Constitutional Court has ruled that a “dissenting” discourse is contrary to the Constitution and is considered a hate speech crime. The State Council found that the layoff of the gay teacher was illegal and decided in favor of the teacher. A delegation from the Supreme Criminal Court sentenced the murdered father to life in the head of his 17-year-old homosexual son and uncle, who he instigated. Memoranda of Understanding; Instead of “sexual preferences”, we had prosecutors who could print the phrase “sexual orientation”.

While it can copy examples, our country; How true is it in the same category as countries like Rwanda and Ghana? Of course, our country and the world today weren’t easy on LGBTI rights. Especially those working in the entertainment industry became very violent and jobs were ransacked.

The general expectation, of course, is not that a governor will join the Pride March and hide a rainbow flag in his hand. However, tens of thousands of people are taking part in this march, a

Brazil Court Puts Homophobia and Transphobia in Crime

The Brazilian Constitutional Court has turned homophobia and transphobia into a crime. A question was raised in February, but the process could not be completed due to procedures. So far, the process is complete.

The Brazilian Supreme Court has decided to punish crimes of sexual orientation and gender by six votes to five in accordance with the applicable law on racism. According to the law, people who had sexism with a sexual orientation in Brazil receive three years in prison and fines.

Supreme Court Vice President Louis Fuchs said homophobic violence was widespread due to the game he played. “Homophobic crimes are just as disturbing as physical violence,” he said.

Activists say the solution, which is the result of 20 years of effort, will provide real protection for the LGBT + “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender +” community, which is constantly being attacked.

At least 142 LGBT killings were committed in Brazil in 2019

“We cannot turn a blind eye to those who are raped and killed every day,” said David Miranda, one of Brazil’s most famous politicians. Mayu George, director of GBT’s Mothers for Diversity, said:

“If a person is threatened only by his existence, there can only be resistance, no existence.”

According to a recently published study, in 2019 alone, 141 Brazilian LGBT people died as a result of a murder. Gay Group of Bahia, Brazil’s largest LGBT organization, has announced that LGBT people are killed in Brazil every 25 hours.

President Bolsonaro is known for his homophilic speeches.

Jair Bolsonaro, who was elected president on January 1, 2019, is known for his homophonic rhetoric. Before becoming president, Bolsonaro clearly expressed his position on the equality of married and homosexual couples in the hate language that he used. Bolsonaro told reporters that his country would not allow him to become a “paradise for gay tourism.”

Brazil has had equality in marriage since 2013, but LGBT people are worried about Bolsonaro’s rhetoric.

05/2019

Short Movie Against Homophobia

The short film for “Amnesty International” has been linked to by dozens of sites, news portals and blogs. In the online gay world, there have been tens of thousands of visitors among the Turkish Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Community, enjoying the most rights in the world.

As at March 2008, the video has been viewed over 73,000 times. “Amnesty International” and the Publicis group also sent an e-mail with the TV spot attached to a database of over 56,000 e-mail addresses, thus setting in motion the whole viral mechanism around the initiative.

A short film for a greater cause.

In post-revolutionary Ukraine, homophobia and oppression deepen

It wasn’t supposed to begin like this. But exactly 14 months to the day after the Euromaidan protests, the Ukraine, unburdened by the heavy-handed influence of Russia, has seen a rise in homophobia and a willingness by the country’s relatively liberal gay community to squash equally revolutionary tactics for wider acceptance.

In a thought-provoking piece on ForeignPolicy.com, Dimiter Kenarov retraces the steps leading up to a cultural, political and economic war against the Ukrainian LGBT community that was supposed to be anything but.

As the narrative goes, the Ukraine, in a bloody, often times lopsided military campaign, unshackled itself from the wizened Cold War grip of once-mother-country Russia. The plan was for the Ukraine to turn to the West, not only to gain acceptance in the European Union, but to prove that the country was an economically viable country to do business with.

But even the pessimists among the LGBT community could not have anticipated the levels of hate that rose from the ashes of a new Ukraine. There was the grenade bombing of Kiev’s Zhovten (October) theater, the oldest in the city where Les Nuits d’Été (Summer Nights) was playing as part of Ukraine’s annual Molodist film festival, which included a selection of queer-themed features, and many in the audience — about a hundred people in all — belonged to Kiev’s LGBT community. The ensuing fire destroyed the roof of this iconic theater and rendered it useless. No one was injured.

Two days after, a dozen or so men branding the insignia of the ultranationalistic group Right Sector attempted to shut down a screening of another gay film. It was, in their world view, “amoral.” But according to the article, “[When] asked at the recent Eurocities Conference how he would support human rights after the Zhovten homophobic attacks, Maidan’s hero and current Kiev mayor Vitali Klitschko said he considered human rights a good thing, but would “not stand up for gays and lesbians.”

Lovely.

But is it really surprising in a fundamentally conservative society that we should see a rise in nationalistic sentiment? Kenarov reports: Although it was decriminalized after Ukraine became independent in 1991, negative social attitudes persist to this day. According to a 2013 poll conducted by GfK Group, almost 80 percent of Ukrainians say they oppose any sexual relations between people of the same sex. In another poll, by the Ukrainian Gay Alliance and Ukrainian State Sociological Institute, 63 percent labeled homosexuality “a perversion” and “a mental disease.” That same year, a survey within the LGBT community carried out by Nash Mir Center found that 65 percent of respondents faced infringements of their rights due to sexual discrimination. The list included verbal abuse, intimidation and loss of employment or direct physical violence. Few of these cases (about 15 percent) ever get reported to the police authorities because of the victims’ fear of further reprisals and humiliation. There have been other cases of arson, too, long before the one at the Zhovten theater: In 2009, the Kiev art gallery Ya was set on fire after the presentation of a gay literary anthology.

Worse, after liberal and conservatives fought bravely together to push back at Russia’s own geopolitical land grabs, the LGBT community acquiesced to calls for restraint in public demonstrations, realizing fully that in the current political climate, displays of rainbow flags or public displays of same-sex affection were “huge liabilities.”

As it stands now, certain parts of eastern Ukraine have criminalized homosexuality, using Vladimir Putin’s own directives against LGBT ‘propaganda’ as both a legal and moral template. In the Crimea, newly installed Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov has bluntly stated that they “do not need such people.”

And, for right now, Ukraine’s push westward is a blessing and a curse, a time of new beginnings masking a fearful nation undergoing profound social and economic change. And caught in the middle of the storm? An LGBT community equally frightened but for an entirely different set of reasons.

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